It is now legal in Wisconsin to test drugs for fentanyl – Journal Times

Get the latest in local public safety news with this weekly email.
An addict injects heroin, even as a fentanyl test strip registered a positive result for contamination, in this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, in New York. He said the test strips are hard to come by, but he’s used them usually when he bought drugs from a new dealer. All those tests were positive. He said he took the drugs anyway, starting with a smaller dose often referred to as a “tester shot.”
Approximately 75% of all U.S. drug deaths in the past year involve opioids, and the majority of that 75% included fentanyl. Now, drug users in Wisconsin will be able to legally test their drug of choice for a prevalence of the synthetic opioid that’s at least 50 times more potent than morphine.
This May 10, 2018, file photo shows an arrangement of fentanyl test strips in New York.
A bipartisan bill that became Wisconsin law on Wednesday decriminalized fentanyl testing strips.
Previously, only authorities such as law enforcement agencies were allowed to use fentanyl testing strips, since they are considered drug paraphernalia. Now, anyone in the state can have access to them.
The strips are effectively a litmus test: Dip the strip into some water and then dip the strip into some of the drug. Within a minute or two, a different number of lines will appear or the color of the strip will change color, depending on the brand of the strip, indicating whether fentanyl is present in the drugs.
If MDMA or cocaine or other substance tests positive for the much more dangerous fentanyl, a person might not use it, and avoid an overdose as a result.
The bill Democratic Gov. Tony Evers signed Wednesday was co-introduced by five Democrats and two Republicans, including state Sen. Van Wanggaard, a Racine Republican and a retired Racine police officer.
Wanggaard
“With easy access to fentanyl, drug dealers are lacing all types of illegal prescription and nonprescription drugs, such as Xanax and Adderall,” Wanggaard said in a statement Wednesday. “Decriminalizing testing strips will allow law enforcement officers, firefighters, medical providers, and others to test substances like these.”
Racine County is planning on distributing them to the public, but plans on how to do that have not been finalized. The Milwaukee Health Department announced plans Wednesday to distribute 1,600 testing strips.
“The testing strips will be a valuable tool to help prevent death from overdose. I applaud the work of Supervisor Ortiz-Velez to make these strips available and easily accessible to the community,” Shakita LaGrant-McClain, director of the Milwaukee County Department of Health and Human Services, said in a statement. “The most important step is keeping people alive so they can get the treatment and help to give them the best quality of life possible.”
Such programs have shown to be successful in preventing overdoses when implemented elsewhere. They’re commonly found in bowls on bar counters in and around San Francisco. New York City’s health department already distributes them and has pamphlets on how to use them.
Also Wednesday, Evers signed two other bipartisan bills related to drugs.
Increasing the severity of the “penalties
Wanggaard said the changes to Wisconsin law related to fentanyl “will save lives, period.”
Chris Farley when he was an infant.
A young Chris Farley (second from left) with his family.
Chris Farley’s senior class portrait from Edgewood High School in Madison.
Chris Farley, front left, and Matt Foley, front right, were members of the Marquette University rugby team in 1984.
Comedian Chris Farley pictured on September 18, 1990. This was Farley’s first year as a cast member of Saturday Night Live.
Chris Farley during a sketch early in his comedy career.
The cast of NBC’s “Saturday Night Live” pose on the show’s set in New York, Sept. 22, 1992.
From left, front row, are: Chris Farley, Al Franken and Melanie Hutsell. In middle row, from left, are: Chris Rock, Julia Sweeney, Dana Carvey and Rob Schneider. In back row, from left, are: Adam Sandler, David Spade, Ellen Cleghorne, Kevin Nealon, Phil Hartman and Tim Meadows.
Dana Carvey and Chris Farley on the set of the movie “Wayne’s World.” Farley had a small part in the movie.
“Saturday Night Live” cast members Chris Farley, left, and Dana Carvey share a laugh on the set of the NBC show during a news conference in New York, Sept. 23, 1992. (AP Photo/Justin Sutcliffe)
Chris Farley was devoted to his family and loved to spend time with his mother, Mary Anne Farley.
Chris Farley on the set of the movie “Beverly Hills Ninja.”
House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia, left, poses with “Saturday Night Live” actor Chris Farley, who impersonates Gingrich, on Capitol Hill in this April 4, 1995 photo.
House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Ga., right, along with fellow Republican House members, laugh as “Saturday Night Live” star Chris Farley, center, “portrays” Gingrich, on Capitol Hill in Washington, April 4, 1995. House Majority Leader Dick Armey, of Texas, is seen above Farley.
Chris Farley leaves a private Madison showing of “Black Sheep” in October 1996 with friends, fans, and reporters in tow.
Chris Farley, left, who died 20 years ago today, frequently found time to spend with his fans, including a large group following a private Madison showing of his 1996 movie, “Black Sheep.”
Chris Farley pals around with Dreamworks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg in 1997 during production work for the movie “Shrek.” Farley was the cast as the voice of Shrek but died before the movie was finished and it was recast with Mike Myers as Shrek.
Madison native Chris Farley bows to Packers players Andre Rison, left, Sean Jones and Edgar Bennett as Jay Leno looks on during a taping of “The Tonight Show” after Green Bay’s Super Bowl victory in 1997. Farley, who loved to showcase his Wisconsin roots, presented the players with cheesehead hats.
Publicity photo of Chris Farley taken in 1997.
Presenter Chris Farley, center, hugs Best Animated Short Film winners Tyron Montgomery, left, and Thomas Stellmach at the 69th annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles Monday, March 24, 1997. Montgomery and Stellmach won for “Quest.”
Presenter Chris Farley, background, reacts as Thomas Stellmach accepts the award for Best Animated Short Film for “Quest,” at the 69th Annual Academy Awards at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, Monday, March 24, 1997. 
“Saturday Night Live” actor Rob Schneider (center) and actor Tom Arnold (right) comfort a friend at the church during Farley’s funeral in 1997.
Chris Rock and friend arrive at the funeral for Chris Farley in Madison, Wis. on December 23, 1997. 
Among the celebrities who attended Chris Farley’s funeral at Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church on Dec. 23, 1997, were Tom Arnold, second from left, and Rob Schneider, in glasses at right.
Guests arrive at the chapel at Resurrection Catholic Cemetery before the entombment of Chris Farley.
Among the guests are writer-comedian Al Franken, far left under the canopy; comedian George Wendt, center; the Rev. Matt Foley, seventh from right; comedian Adam Sandler, talking to Foley with his back to the camera; comedian Rob Schneider, fourth from right; and actress Bonnie Hunt, second from right.
“Saturday Night Live” producer Lorne Michaels, who considered Chris Farley one of the most talented actors to have worked on the show, walks alone in Resurrection Catholic Cemetery in Madison after Farley’s entombment on Dec. 23, 1997.
Mourners at Chris Farley’s funeral on Dec. 23, 1997 comfort each other outside Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church.
Chris Farley’s mother, Mary Ann Farley (center), talks with mourners at Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church at Chris Farley’s funeral on Dec. 23, 1997. Among the mourners was actor George Wendt (far right), who performed with Farley in some classic Saturday Night Live skits.
Pallbearers place Chris Farley’s coffin in the hearse at the conclusion of Farley’s funeral on Dec. 23, 1997. The pallbearers were all boyhood friends of the actor.
A hearse containing the body of actor Chris Farley leaves the parking lot of Our Lady Queen of Peace following the Madison native’s funeral on Dec. 23, 1997.
A procession of limousines with family and friends of Chris Farley follows the hearse carrying Farley’s body to Resurrection Catholic Cemetery for internment there on Dec. 23, 1997. 
The Chris Farley funeral procession makes its way to Resurrection Catholic Cemetery on Madison’s West Side.
Chris Farley made millions laugh with his comedy so reporters and photographers from media outlets across the country descended on Madison to cover his funeral on Dec. 23, 1997.
Chris Farley’s final resting place in a Madison mausoleum.
Chris Farley’s grave marker.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Get the latest in local public safety news with this weekly email.
Reporter-Local Editor
Adam does a little bit of everything with the JT, from everyday news to localizing state & national politics. He grew up in Racine County, believes in the Oxford comma and loves digital subscribers: journaltimes.com/subscribenow | @Could_Be_Rogan
{{description}}
Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

A man is still alive, but in critical condition, after being shot in the head Sunday night in Racine, the Racine Police Department reported.

The man who also lived at the residence, for whom the suspect was hired to take care of, was not identified in a criminal complaint and there was no indication he was involved in drug dealing.

Two kids are in custody after one allegedly discharged a firearm in a bathroom at Jerstad-Agerholm Elementary School.

“Football was very special to him,” one of his former coaches said. “It was an escape for him.”

Two houses were reported shot on Racine’s north side Monday night.

A Racine teenager allegedly was involved in causing $8,000 worth of damage to a rental property last year. He made his first appearance in court Monday.
RACINE — A Racine man has been accused of biting a minor’s cheek and trying to break his arms.

Peggy Lynn Johnson-Schroeder had been known as Racine County’s Jane Doe from 1999-2019. Now, the woman accused of killing her has faced a jury and is headed to prison.
BURLINGTON — A West Allis man has been accused of shoving a woman’s head in a toilet and giving her a “deathly swirly.”

The young woman from Illinois whose body was left in a Racine County cornfield in 1999, died from a fatal bacterial infection that may have entered her body from one of many wounds. 
An addict injects heroin, even as a fentanyl test strip registered a positive result for contamination, in this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, in New York. He said the test strips are hard to come by, but he’s used them usually when he bought drugs from a new dealer. All those tests were positive. He said he took the drugs anyway, starting with a smaller dose often referred to as a “tester shot.”
This May 10, 2018, file photo shows an arrangement of fentanyl test strips in New York.
Wanggaard
Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

source

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published.